Elbow Tendonitis Exercises At Home

July 13, 2010 by  
Filed under tennis elbow

elbow-tendonitis-exercises Elbow tendonitis, also known as tennis elbow, is a repetitive stress injury that can be very challenging to overcome.  It’s not uncommon for some elbow tendonitis sufferers to simply give up trying to cure their elbow pain and surrender to this disability but…

This is when you need to step it up a notch and become more informed about how to REALLY cure elbow tendonitis.

When it comes to eliminating your elbow pain, knowledge is power!

Most people that suffer from tennis elbow will have difficulty with a number of daily chores including holding a cup of coffee or simply turning a doorknob to open a door.  This can cause extreme pain and in order to combat this there are a couple of effective elbow tendonitis exercises that you can do on a daily basis to help ease your pain.

There are 3 simple exercises for elbow tendonitis that will drastically alleviate some of your elbow pain symptoms. These exercises are effective because they specifically target and focus on improving your range of motion and decreasing your arm stiffness.

When you perform these exercises on a daily basis, they will help to strengthen your injured elbow tendons and forearm muscles.

Elbow Tendonitis Exercise 1

The first of these 3 simple exercises for elbow tendonitis is an exercise called wrist extensions.  For this exercise you will need something that is heavy but not too heavy.  A litre bottle of soda or a can of food can be used.

What you will need to do is to put the object into your hand with your palm facing down towards the floor.  You will need to support your forearm whilst doing this exercise on a table or armrest of a chair.  You need only move your hand for this exercise.  Let your wrist down slowly whilst holding your object, a 90 degree angle with your forearm is perfect if you can manage this.  Then bring your wrist slowly back up so that it is again parallel with the floor.  Repeat this exercise a number of times but be sure to stop if the pain gets too much.  This exercise will help to strengthen the damaged and weakened muscles in your forearm.

Elbow Tendonitis Exercise 2

The second  exercises is called the Forearm pronation/supination exercise.  A basic requirement in order to perform this exercise correctly is that you need an object you can get a good tight grip on that has some weight to it.

My best suggestion would be a hammer. You will need to support your forearm for this exercise again too.  Once you have a firm grip on the object you can begin.  Your hand should be perpendicular to the floor and you will start by rotating your hand so that your palm is facing the floor.   Return to the starting position and rotate again only this time rotate in the opposite direction so that your palm is facing upwards.

As you do this exercise you will feel the muscles in your forearm tightening and moving.  Like the previous exercise a number of repetitions daily is sufficient but remember to stop if the pain is too much.  You can also increase or decrease the amount of resistance in this exercise by moving your hand closer or further away from the head of the hammer.  The lower your hand is on the hammer, the more resistance you will feel and the more challenging the exercise becomes.

Elbow Tendonitis Exercises 3

And last but not least is the finger extension exercise.  For this exercise you are going to need a thick rubber band to interweave around all your fingers.  For this exercise you are going to need to try to keep your elbow as straight as possible.  Then you are going to try and straighten and spread your fingers out as far as you can.  Imagine you are trying to catch a ball.  Hold this for about three to five seconds and then let your fingers relax.  You should not close your hand completely when you relax your fingers.  If your tennis elbow symptoms are too painful when doing this exercise then just straighten your elbow as much as you can and try the exercise.  If you want to add resistance you can use an extra rubber band.  You should try to repeat this exercise for 20 repetitions and build up to sets of 3.

These exercises are by far the most effective form of elbow tendonitis treatment, which won’t cost you a cent!

Elbow tendonitis exercises are a great way to put you on the road to recovery and they are something that you can do on your own from the comfort of your own home too.

Go ahead and click the button below to learn just how easy and cheap it is to cure your elbow tendonitis at home in 5 simple steps!

exercises elbow tendonitis

 

It’s free!

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3 Responses to “Elbow Tendonitis Exercises At Home”

  1. Greg from Posterior Tibial Tendonitis on September 4th, 2010 1:54 pm

    Having shoulder tendonitis is not an uncommon thing. You’ll usually hear big celebrity athletes getting them from time to time, but they always manage to recover. It’s very rare for someone to give up on a sport because of a tear within the rotator cuffs, though it has happened. Usually the player may opt in for some type of medication as that is the most popular shoulder tendonitis treatment administered, and it can reduce the swelling much faster than surgery.

  2. 5 Step Home Elbow Tendonitis Treatment | How to Treat Tendonitis | TennisElbowTips.com on March 23rd, 2011 2:44 am

    […] it really takes are 5 simple, step-by-step techniques and elbow tendonitis exercises that you can do while watching your favorite television show from the comfort of home without any […]

  3. Jeff on May 10th, 2011 11:49 am

    I have tried the forearm pronation/supination exercise and it made my elbows worse. Then I went to a chiro and he told me to stop all exercises for atleast a month. It’s been 3 months and the pain has eased but, as I get back to weightlifting the pain is beginning to come back. I don’t plan to see the chiro anymore, he did say to stop the forearm pronation/supination exercise which aggrevated my situation. I purchased a ultrasonic massager which he did not believe in. When I used it before seeing him I did notice significant pain relief. Is there any scientific proof that ultrasonics work? Do laser treatments work better? Thanks for your article.

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